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Coconut Facts

Coconut-Milk-720x513

It has been used for thousands of years in ancient India as a healing fruit.

It takes around 9 months for a coconut to filter all of the water that it contains. This makes the water completely pure & sterile, which is why it can be used for blood transfusions.

It has the highest concentration of electrolytes of anything found in nature.

Younger coconuts contain the purest unsaturated fats and are better than mature coconuts.

It boots the immune system, boosts metabolism, and improves thyroud function.

It makes a great topical oil(use a TINY bit – it goes a long way!) that can help to naturally rid the skin of dangerous toxins. It also gives the skin the perfect mix of hydration and antioxidants that it needs to stay healthy, smooth and younger-looking longer.

Eight ounces of coconut water has 46 calories, 9 grams of carbohydrates, 250 mg of sodium, 200-500 mg of potassium, 60 mg of magnesium, 45 mg of phosphorus, and 2 grams of protein. The electrolyte content is more than double that of traditional sports drinks with about half of the carbohydrates. (Potassium is an essential macromineral in human nutrition; it is the major cation (positive ion) inside cells, and it is important in maintaining fluid and electrolyte balance in the body.)

According to researchers, individuals with high blood pressure usually have low potassium levels. Therefore, drinking coconut water on a regular basis can be quite effective at regulating blood pressure.

Coconut milk (made from the meat of the coconut) has 500-600 calories, and coconut water(liquid inside) contains about 50 calories.

A few studies have shown coconut water to have cytokinins which are beneficial for anti-aging, anti-carcinogenic and anti-thrombotic effects. The American Institute for Cancer Research says that some of the compounds in coconut water, such as selenium, have antioxidant properties and fight cancer in the lab(many common fruits and vegetables are packed with these compounds). Several animal studies suggest coconut water can lower cholesterol and blood pressure, but this research is too preliminary to make any claims  yet.

An article with numerous facts & info: http://www.organicfacts.net/organic-oils/organic-coconut-oil/health-benefits-of-coconut-oil.html

Another article with information & factoids: http://www.thepaleosecret.com/2012/07/19/top-10-health-benefits-of-coconut-oil/
cco orgmilk

Infographic-Benefits-of-Coconut-Oil

 


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Mesolithic hunter-gatherers eating a meat, grain-free diet had much healthier mouths than we have – almost no cavities or gum disease

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Mesolithic hunter-gatherers living on a meat-dominated, grain-free diet had much healthier mouths that we have today — with almost no cavities and gum disease-associated bacteria, a genetic study of ancient dental plaque has revealed.

An international team of researchers, led by a group at the Australian Center for Ancient DNA, University of Adelaide, published their findings in  Nature Genetics.

Read the article HERE

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What is Vitamin H?

biotin-hair-growth-300x150Strawberry health alphabet  Biotin-hair

Vitamin H is also known as Biotin.

Sources of vitamin H include: almonds, peanuts, pecans, walnuts, cauliflower, bananas, organ meat, & egg yolk.  Raw egg whites contain a protein called Avidin that interferes with the body’s absorption of biotin.

People who are deficient in vitamin H may suffer from neurological disorders, growth retardation and skin abnormalities such as: hair loss, dry scaly skin, cracking in the corners of the mouth (cheilitis), swollen and painful tongue that is magenta in color (glossitis), dry eyes, loss of appetite, fatigue, insomnia, and depression.

The average adult should be getting 30 mcg/day of vitamin H. Vitamin H may help hair re-grow(if lost due to diet), strengthen fingernails up to 60-90%, and possibly help those with diabetes mellitus.


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Sensitive to sugar, diabetic, or just cutting it out of your diet? Glycemic Index & Load Chart (White Rice is worse than a can of Cola!!!)

The glycemic index (GI) is a ranking of carbohydrates on a scale from 0 to 100 according to the extent to which they raise blood sugar levels after eating. Foods with a high GI are those which are rapidly digested and absorbed and result in marked fluctuations in blood sugar levels. Low-GI foods, by virtue of their slow digestion and absorption, produce gradual rises in blood sugar and insulin levels, and have proven benefits for health. Low GI diets have been shown to improve both glucose and lipid levels in people with diabetes (type 1 and type 2). They have benefits for weight control because they help control appetite and delay hunger. Low GI diets also reduce insulin levels and insulin resistance.

The glycemic load of a food tells how much eating that food raises blood glucose. It is a similar concept as the glycemic index, except it takes serving sizes into account. The formula is to take the number of grams of carbohydrate in the serving, multiply by the glycemic index, and divide by 100. Theoretically, if a food has glycemic load of one point, it would raise the blood sugar as much as one gram of glucose.

An awareness of foods’ Glycemic Index can help you control your blood sugar levels, and by doing so, may help you prevent heart disease, improve cholesterol levels, prevent insulin resistance and type-2 diabetes, prevent certain cancers, and achieve or maintain a healthy weight. A substantial amount of research suggests a low GI diet provides these significant health benefits.

After we eat carbohydrate-rich foods, our digestive process breaks them down and turns them into glucose, which enters bloodstream. (Since most proteins and fats are not turned into glucose , they have much less of an immediate effect on our blood sugar). Glucose in the bloodstream triggers the production of insulin, a hormone that helps glucose get into cells where it can be used for energy. Once our immediate energy needs have been met, extra glucose still remaining in the bloodstream will be stored in our muscles and liver for later use. If our muscle and liver stores of glucose are full, but we still have extra glucose floating around in our blood, then our body will store this excess sugar as fat.

Food Glycemic Index One Serving Glycemic Load
Coca-Cola 63 250ml 16
Gatoraide 78 250ml 12
Instant Oatmeal 83 250ml 30
Cornflakes 93 250ml 23
Quinoa 53 150ml 13
White Rice 89 150ml 43
Brown Rice 50 150ml 16
Apple 39 120ml 6
Banana 62 120ml 16
Grapefruit 25 120ml 3
Orange 40 120ml 4
Pear 38 120ml 4
Prune 29 60ml 10
Raisins 64 60ml 28
Watermelon 72 120ml 4
Peanuts 7 50ml 0
Black Beans 30 150ml 7
Carrots 35 80ml 2
Boiled White Potato(average) 82 150ml 21
Sweet Potato 70 150ml 22
Bread – French baguette 95 1oz.
Cereal Cheerios General Mills 95 1 cup, 1oz.
Cereal Rice Chex General Mills 89 1 1/4 cup, 1oz.
Cherries 22 10 large, 3oz.
Dark Chocolate(60%+ cocoa) 22
Crackers – saltine 72
Tofu frozen dessert low fat 115  1/2 cup, 2 ozs
Dates, dried 103  5 or 1.4ozs
Parsnips, boiled 97  1/2 cup, 2.5 ozs.
Sweet potato, peeled, boiled 54 1/2 cup mashed, 3 ozs.
White bread 70 1 slice or 1oz
Whole wheat bread 69 1 slice or 1oz
French fries 75
Grapenuts Cereal 75  30g  16
Pineapple, raw 66  120g  6
Ocean Spray Cranberry juice cocktail 68  250ml  24
Beef steak, battered, fried, lean & fat eaten 50  250ml  3.6

A food is generally considered to have a high GI if it is rated above 60.

Individuals who have problems with maintaining proper blood sugar levels should restrict their selection to foods with a GI of 40 or less. These include those who have low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) and high blood sugar (hyperinsulemia) as well as those who have a high sensitivity to sugar. Sugar includes not just simple sugars, honey and maple syrup but also fruits, fruit juices, starchy vegetables and grain products or foods with a high glycemic index.

FYI…..Average GI of beer = 110.

Why doesn’t the GI chart include things like beef, chicken, fish, nuts, seeds, avocadoes, and berries? These foods contain no carbohydrate, or so little that their GI cannot be tested according to the standard methodology. Bear in mind that the GI is a measure of carbohydrate quality. Essentially, these types of foods, eaten alone, won’t have much effect on your blood glucose levels.


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Fat, Sick, & Nearly Dead Documentary Director’s 3-Day Weekend Juice Cleanse

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For 3 days, you will drink a total of 5 juices per day – and eat one meal that consists of only fruits and vegetables.  You will have:

Watch Joe Cross’ Documentary Online (it’s on sale for just $2.99 – you just click on it and watch it like a youtube video once you’ve paid for it): http://www.amazon.com/Fat-Sick-Nearly-Dead/dp/B004V4ASGC/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1367643664&sr=8-1&keywords=fat+sick+and+nearly+dead

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[Jane Grok note: Please be advised that fruit naturally contains sugar & citric acid. Some of these juices will contain high levels of both, depending upon the fruit that is used. If you are avoiding sugar or taking any Rx, you may want to leave out or substitute some of the ingredients.]

A few more of his juice recipes:

ABCs
2 Asian pears
2 Apples (Choose any variety!)
2 Beets
2 Carrots
1 cup Cabbage (choose any variety!)
6 handfuls Chard 3 cups

Calories: 430
Protein: 11 g
Fiber: 2 g

Apple-Beet-Carrot Juice
1 Apple
2 Beets
3 Large Carrots
1 Piece Ginger (thumb sized)
4 cups Spinach/Kale

Calories: 280
Protein: 8 g
Fiber: 2 g

Apple-Cantaloupe-Honeydew-Kale-
Swiss Chard
2 Apples
1/2 Cantaloupe
1/2 Honeydew
6-8 leaves Kale
6-8 leaves Swiss Chard

Calories: 320
Protein: 10 g
Fiber: 4 g

Apple-Carrot-Beet
2 Apples
4 Carrots
2 Beets
6 leaves swiss chard – 1.5 cup
1″ ginger root (1 tablespoon)

Calories: 300
Protein: 9 g
Fiber: 2.5 g

Apple-Cabbage-Carrot-Swiss Chard-
Ginger-Lemon
2 Apples
1 wedge Red Cabbage
2 Large Carrots
1 Piece Ginger (thumb sized)
6 leaves Swiss Chard
1/4 lemon

Calories: 321
Protein: 10 g
Fiber: 2 g

Beet, Celeriac, Carrot Juice
4 Carrots, stems removed
1/2-1 Apple, seeded
1/2 Celeriac root
1 Beet
1/4 inch slice Ginger root (optional)

Calories: 285
Protein: 7 g
Fiber: 1 g

Blackberry Kiwi
1/4 large Pineapple, core removed and roughly cubed
1 cup Blackberries
1 Kiwi Fruit
1/4 Comice Pear
1/4 cup Coconut Water
30 Mint leaves

Calories: 230
Protein: 5 g
Fiber: 2 g

Carrot-Kale Combo
1 Green Apple
3 handfuls Spinach
6-8 Kale leaves
4 large Carrots
1 piece Ginger (thumb size)

Calories: 280
Protein: 9 g
Fiber: 1 g

Gazpacho Juice
4 Plum Tomatoes
1 large Cucumber
2 stalks Celery
1 Red Bell Pepper
1/4 small Red Onion
2 cups Parsley, leaves and stems, roughly chopped
and packed into the measuring cup
1 Lime

Calories: 250
Protein: 12 g
Fiber: 2 g

Great Green Fruity Mix
2 cups Beet Greens, Red Swiss Chard, Kale, Spinach or a combination,
roughly chopped and packed into the measuring cup
1 Golden Delicious Apple
1/2 Comice Pear
10 Strawberries, green tops cut off
1 cup Coconut Water

Calories: 255
Protein: 6 g
Fiber: 3 g

Great Greens Juice
2 Green Apples
2-3 cups Spinach
6-8 leaves Swiss Chard
1 Cucumber
4 stalks Celery
1/2 Fennel Bulb
1 bunch Basil

Calories: 329 kcal
Protein: 16 g
Fiber: 2 g

Green Juice
6 leaves Kale
2 cups Spinach
1/2 Cucumber
4 stalks Celery
2 Apples
1″ Ginger root

Calories: 180
Protein: 12 g
Fiber: 1 g

Green Lemonade
1 Green Apple
3 handfuls Spinach, 1.5 cup
6-8 Kale leaves, 2 cups
1/2 Cucumber
4 Celery Stalks
1/2 Lemon

Calories: 210
Protein: 10 g
Fiber: 1 g

Lemon Lime
1 Lemon
1 Lime
2 Asian Pears
2 Green Apples
2 Carrots
1 Piece Ginger (thumb sized)
2 cups Purple Cabbage

Calories: 410
Protein 7 g
Fiber 1 g

Mexican-Style Jugo
2 large Cucumbers
4 cups Cilantro, leaves and stems, roughly chopped and packed
into the measuring cup
1 Lime
1 Poblano Pepper, ribs and seeds removed
1 Golden Delicious Apple

Calories: 200
Protein: 8 g
Fiber: 2 g

Minty-Fresh Berry
2 cups Blueberries
2 Kiwi Fruit
16 Strawberries
2 cups Mint leaves, packed into the measuring cup

Calories: 319
Protein: 5 g
Fiber: 4 g

Purple Power Juice
6 cups Concord Grapes
1 Golden Delicious Apple
2 2 x 2″ pieces Ginger
1/2 cup Blackberries

Calories: 480
Protein: 4 g
Fiber: 1.5 g

Refreshing Fennel-Pear
2 Comice Pears
2 medium Fennel Bulbs

Calories: 306
Protein: 7 g
Fiber: 3 g

Spinach-Fennel-Cucumber
1 Fennel Bulb
1 Cucumber
3 Celery Stalks
3 cups Spinach

Calories: 170
Protein: 10 g
Fiber: 1 g

Sunset Blend Juice
1 large Sweet Potato
1 medium Carrot
1 Red Bell Pepper
2 large Red Beets
2 Golden Delicious Apples
1 Orange, optional

Calories: 436
Protein: 9 g
Fiber: 2 g

Sweet N Tart Citrus
3 cups Cranberries
2 2 x 2″ pieces Ginger
3 Oranges
2 small Ruby Red Grapefruit
2 Limes

Calories: 500
Protein: 7 g
Fiber: 9 g

V28
3 large Red Beets
2 medium Carrots
2 stalks Celery
4 Plum Tomatoes
4 cups Parsley, leaves and stems, roughly chopped and packed into the measuring cup
1 Jalapeno, ribs and seeds removed
12 Red Radishes

Calories: 340
Protein: 17 g
Fiber: 2 g


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Good night’s sleep linked to happiness

sleep-image-001“The team found that, as expected, having a more positive general outlook on life was associated with improved sleep quality. However, they found that the more reactive or fragile a participant’s positive emotions were in relation to external events, the more their sleep was impaired, especially for individuals high in positivity to begin with.”  Read more


Symptoms

I think stress, prolonged stress especially, contributes to and/or worsens any hidden or surfaced diseases and issues that we may have. This includes viruses, cancers, heart problems, etc. Here are my symptoms:

At the start:

developed severe anemia

fainting

fatigue

Then developed:

thinning, brittle hair

premature grays

melasma (diagnosed)

lactose intolerant

allergies

heart feels like its fluttering or beating really fast (doesn’t hurt, it’s just weird)

Now:

severe (beyond migraine) pain in the right temple/jaw/head area — once

blinding flashes of lights in my eyesight and feeling like my brain is “vibrating” — a few times

vertigo — numerous times

severe allergies — off and on

thin, ripping apart, peeling, ridged nails — all the time

dehydration no matter how much water I drink — all the time

stomach issues when I eat simple things like a sandwich or rice and beans (I’ve been 90% gluten-free for about 6 months, I feel great without that junk)

I have a ton of stress.  I firmly believe that I could make changes much faster if I were able to remove myself from or erase my current stressors. I know I need to come up with a way to stop the stress, but right now it’s just not gonna happen. So I’m going to do the best I can right now until my situation(s) change.

I plan to take and upload photos, once I’ve started showing/making physical progress. The last time I went to a doctor, they didn’t scream ANEMIA!! or anything at me – so I know the changes I’m making are at least starting to show internally. Hopefully they will start to show up externally soon. Meanwhile, please feel free to check out some Grokspiration of people that have made some amazing changes!